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The Twelve Virtues of a Good Teacher

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This is a small booklet providing a classic reflection on 12 Virtues for a Good Teacher that St. John Baptist de La Salle listed in one of his texts. Brother Agathon’s exposition on each virtue has endures through the centuries and remains very relevant even today. Along with a printed booklet version, it is also available online at this link.

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A Little More Information

This small booklet provides a contemporary translation of an insightful, heartfelt, 19th century exposition of a short of list of virtues originally provided, without comment, by John Baptist de La Salle. It is considered by many to be the most significant work in education in the Lasallian heritage, after “The Conduct of the Christian Schools.”

According to the preface to the text, “Some 100 years after the first schools, it affords a kind of benchmark by which to judge the fidelity of the Institute to the founding vision. This significance is primarily because of the inherent value of the text itself but also because of it wide diffusion outside of the Institute [of the Brothers of the Christian Schools]. Translated from the original French into Italian in 1797 and into English, Spanish, Dutch, and German during the 19th century, the work was a major text in many Catholic colleges of teacher education until the 1930s.”

(1785; 63 pg.)

Author: Br. Agathon Gonlieu, F.S.C. (Superior General, 1777-1798)

Publisher: Christian Brothers Conference – Lasallian Region of North America

Note: Along with a printed booklet version, it is also available online at this link.

1 review for The Twelve Virtues of a Good Teacher

  1. Rated 4 out of 5

    georgefsc

    Any Lasallian educator of today would find this booklet compelling, and would identify with its sentiments even if the text was written at the cusp of the French Revolution. The large section on “Generosity” is particularly appealing. No wonder that it’s become somewhat of a classic within secular educational establishments and you can find it floating around the internet in all sorts of places.

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